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The Gold Medal Design for the 2010 Winter Olympics

In my last blog post, I wrote about the history of the Olympic rings and the meaning behind the five interconnected circles. Today I’d like to explore the current logo for the 2010 Winter Olympics and provide a little insight into the creator of this design as well as the meaning behind it. In the past few decades, the opportunity to design the Olympic logo has been a highly sought-after project with international recognition. The contest for this year’s winter Olympics in Vancouver was no exception. With over 1,600 entries, 9 judges, and only 1 winner, Gonzalo Alatorre knew his

In my last blog post, I wrote about the history of the Olympic rings and the meaning behind the five interconnected circles. Today I’d like to explore the current logo for the 2010 Winter Olympics and provide a little insight into the creator of this design as well as the meaning behind it.

In the past few decades, the opportunity to design the Olympic logo has been a highly sought-after project with international recognition. The contest for this year’s winter Olympics in Vancouver was no exception. With over 1,600 entries, 9 judges, and only 1 winner, Gonzalo Alatorre knew his chances of winning were slim to none. But like so many other designers who dreamed of the ultimate portfolio piece, Alatorre knew he had a story to tell.

As Gonzalo collaborated with Elena Rivera MacGregor of Rivera Design Group, he worked to create a design that represented his first few years as an immigrant to Canada. The main aspects that he truly sought to capture were the warm and welcoming qualities that so many people exhibited when he first began to learn the culture and land. Vibrant colors were selected to depict these characteristics while simultaneously representing different regions of the country. Green and blues were used to symbolize coastal forests, mountain ranges, and islands. Red represented Canada’s Maple Leaf. And yellow depicted Canada’s brilliant sunrises. The Design Group combined all four colors to create an inukshuk, a traditional stone sculpture used by Canada’s Inuit people. The team’s vision was successfully brought to life and Rivera Design Group was named the winner of the National Vancouver 2010 Olympic Emblem Design Competition.

When John Furlong (CEO of the Vancouver 2010 Organizing Committee) announced  this award to the firm, he said: “I hope you realize that you now belong to a select group of world-class designers.” In fact, less than a dozen Creative Directors in the world that are alive today share this prestigious title. Needless to say, Alatorre and the rest of Rivera Design Group now have a very powerful portfolio.

What do you think of the 2010 Vancouver Olympic logo?